The Newport Bay Conservancy (NBC) is proud to present another of its quarterly research workshops. The program will address the local populations of three bird species of concern. The program will interest scientists, naturalists and the general public. Workshop is free.

Advance registration required.

When: Thursday, June 2 at 7:00 PM

Where: Back Bay Science Center

The Back Bay Science Center is located at 600 Shellmaker Road, Newport Beach, 92660. Directions.

Program starts promptly at 7:00 pm and ends at 9:00. Doors open and light refreshments are served starting at 6:30 pm.

Presentations

Coastal Cactus Wren

Coastal Cactus Wren

1. Declining Populations of the Coastal Cactus Wren, Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus, in Orange County: What we are Learning from Monitoring Reproduction, Dispersal and Survival.

Federal Status: Not currently listed

California status: Species of Special Concern. One of three target species in California’s Natural Communities Conservation Planning Program, and a surrogate for conservation of coastal sage scrub habitat.

Presenter: Dr. Kristine Preston, Science Program Director, Nature Reserve of Orange County

Dr. Preston’s research program focuses on the responses of individuals, populations, species, and communities to environmental change resulting from natural and anthropogenic processes and applying these findings to conservation of sensitive species and natural communities. She will present the results of a three year study to monitor Cactus Wren reproduction, dispersal and survival in Orange County’s Central and Coastal Natural Community Conservation Plan.

Snowy Plover

Snowy Plover

2. Western Snowy Plover, Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus

Federal Status: Threatened (1993): Critical Habitat designated 2005.

California status: Species of Special Concern.

Presenter: Peter Knapp (California Department of Fish & Game)

Peter is a former aerospace manager, professional photographer and wildlife monitoring volunteer, who now works for the California Department of Fish & Game at Bolsa Chica. He has monitored the Western Snowy Plover since the early 90’s as a volunteer for various groups, and has visited most of the breeding sites in California. His field work has guided management actions including the development of nest enclosures to protect against egg predators, especially crows, ravens, kestrels, shrikes, hawks and coyotes.

Least Bell's Vireo

Least Bell's Vireo

3. Least Bell’s Vireo, Vireo bellii pusillus

Federal status: Endangered (1986). Critical habitat designated 1994.

California Status: Endangered (1980).

Presenter: Dr. Barbara Kus, Research Ecologist, USGS Western Ecological Research Center

Dr. Kus studies birds inhabiting coastal drainages of southern California. She has played an important role in addressing the recovery of two riparian-dependent endangered species, the least Bell’s vireo and the southwestern willow flycatcher. She has participated in the development of management plans by Federal, State, and local agencies for these species and has served on numerous recovery teams, working groups, and technical advisory committees.

Photos courtesy of John Avise